Bedrooms

 

bedroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quick Tips

  • Keep a spare set of linens in each bedroom if space allows, especially guest rooms.

 

Linen Closet

A linen closet can corral all the bedding in one place, but sometimes even that gets chaotic. Keep things tidy:

  • Centralize all bedding linens in one optimal closet or in a closet adjacent to the particular room.
  • Group linens by bed size or room use for ease of finding and ease of putting away.
  • This reduces steps and wasted time searching for a specific sheet set.

 

Storage At A Premium

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Lack of space for storing bedroom linens? Invest in a storage trunk. A trunk can function as a decorative and functional piece. The versatility of the trunk can be extended to the dorm room when you send your child off to college.
 
When purchasing bedroom furniture always think “space maximization.” Seek night stands that have drawers, shelves, or storage. A headboard can be beautiful, appealing to our aesthetic nature, and functional. Your or nightstands or even headboard should contain ample space to store tissues, alarm clock, phone, water glasses, reading glasses, and your favorite reading material or romantic pleasures.

 

Maintain – Keep It Neat!

Take 30 seconds to hang your clothes up after wearing them instead of creating piles. Remember, it’s easier to deal with clothes in 30 second intervals rather than 60 minute drudgery segments to hang 1-2 weeks worth.

 

Tools

  • Keep a laundry basket of some sort in every bedroom.
  • Invest in an over-the-door hook that accommodates multiple hanging items.
  • A jewelry armoire can corral all your earrings, bracelets and necklaces.
  • Use a safe for highly valuable items.
 

Reinforcement & Encouragement

 

Overwhelmed? Stressed? Embarrassed? Frustrated? Too much stuff? Buried in clutter? Running out of space and storage options? Don’t know where to start?

 
Are you:
Wasting time? Losing important paperwork? Missing or late to appointments? Ready for a change?
 
Relax… You are not alone; yours is not the worst!
Without realizing it, disorganization can cause frustration in many aspects of our lives. Two causes of disorganization can be procrastination and fear. Procrastination is one of the most powerful habits preventing you from developing your truest potential. And more often than not, the root cause of putting things off is fear. Whether it is fear of failure, all the work it will take, how others will react or just general lack of belief in yourself, fear can and will get in the way of your goals and dreams.
 
Procrastination is simply a way to cover up your fears about a certain goal. Making excuses is a natural defense mechanism to combat those fears. ‘I don’t have time’ becomes your weapon of choice, which has no potency against disorganization and clutter.
 
Remember, you are not the only one who feels:
‘No one else has this problem.’   
‘I should be able to do this on my own.’
‘I am too embarrassed and couldn’t possibly ask for help.’
‘Something is wrong with me.’
 
Once you recognize the ‘what’ and ‘why’, it’s easier to figure out the ‘how’ when conquering objectives like organization.
  • First, identify one task you have been putting off because you haven’t found the time to fit it into your  schedule. What’s on your backburner?
  • Next, ponder why you have been neglecting this task?
    Set emotions aside and focus on the logical issues behind your hesitation for starting the task or project.
  • Write down the pros and cons, so your facts are in black and white.
  • Finally, find someone to lean on when you need help with a decision or encouragement for follow-through. We all have moments of doubt and it is important to have people we can talk with and to give us a hand.
Change is not easy. But, don’t let fear prevent you from fulfilling your potential.
 
Ask yourself:
What is the worst thing that could happen in taking the first step toward this goal?
Will you regret it if you keep setting this task aside?
 
The answers to these two questions can give you the motivation and courage to move ahead. Overcoming disorganization is a manageable life-long commitment. Organization takes dedication and time, but can help you reap benefits in many areas of your life.
 
 
Serenity Prayer:
God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.
 

 

 

Paper Taming

TAXES

Keep file folder in the very front of your filing cabinet for items you think you may need at tax time. If you are really ambitious, make a list of the items you gather
this year and include it in the folder for next year’s taxes. This will serve as a ready-made checklist to help make sure you are not missing anything come April.
 

MAIL

You’ve seen this tip many times. Sort your mail over the trash can or recylce bin. Properly shred documents with identifiable information such as account numbers, social security number, pin, and account numbers.
 

FILING

  • Use easy to remember file names
  • Keep a listing of everything you keep in your wallet or purse, in the case it is lost
     or stolen
  • Keep an envelop in oyou car, and another in your breifcase or purse, for those
     reciepts you acquire on the road
-Organize the files on your computer. It’s much easier to find a file if it is
 catergorized
-Use alphabetical order wherever possible. It’s easy to remember and easy to
 understand when delegating your filing chores
-Make a list where your important documents are stored. Place a copy of the list in
 your home bible and another off premises.
-Have all files that you use reqularly within arms reach of where you do your work.
-Make a decision about how long to keep your periodicals and newspapers. 
 Outdated periodicals 6 months old or older are not very useful. Newspapers that
 are a week old or older are useless also. Recycle whenever possible.
-Designate a specific spot for certain types of mail, such as bills to pay, so you
 know exactly where you should put this mail when you recieve it.
-Create one piece of paper with all the travel phone numbers (airlines, hotels, car
 rental agencies) that you use. (Work Bible)
-Keep a memorabilia file for movie stubs, etc. Review this file at the end of year
 to discard things that don’t mean as much to you as you thought they would.
-Have backups of your computer in place, another copy offsite if possible
-Designate one specific location for all phone messages, such as a spiral
 notebook. even if you scribble a note or phone number somewhere else, be sure
 to transfer that scrap to your designated message location.
-To help control incoming junk mail (especially credit card applications, call the
Preapproved Credit Card Opt Out Line: for Experian, Equifax and TransUnion at
 1-888-567-8688. You can request to omitted from these lists for two years or
 permantly.

-Realize that organization is a process and not an end in itself. The goal of good
 organization is efficiency. The test of an effective organizational system is
 whether you can and do, use it easily to file and find what you have
-Ask yourself these questions:
am i nearing a timeline on this
has this opportunity expired
is thsi passed due, yet still requeires my attention
is this really something for today or is it a project (if so, place in the To Do basket)
is this a miscellaneous paper that I just don’t know what to do with
am i dumping this here to avoid making a decision about it
do i really have to do this today or do i have too much to do already?
Decide what is realistically feasible to accomplish in a given day.
if you are weary and hesitant about dumping something you might regret, put all this stuff in a box and date it, if you have not needed anything in a 3 month date
 
 

Am I nearing a timeline on this?
Has this opportunity expired?
Is this passed due, yet still requires my attention?
Is this really something for today or is it a project?
Is this a miscellaneous paper that I just don’t know what to do with?
Am I dumping this here to avoid making a decision about it?
Do I really have to do this today or do I have too much to do already?
Decide what is realistically feasible to accomplish in a given day.

Office Management (Work or Home) II

1. WORKSPACE
–Should be bright, invigorating, but conducive to work
–Desks should not face doorway or scenic window to minimize distractions
–Chairs should be comfortable, correct height for user, etc.
–Frequently used items should be placed within reach without having to get up out of your chair.
–Move anything that is not used frequently away from the immediate work area or desk
2. DESKTOP
-Desktops are for work, not storage – minimize personal items, plants,
-If non-work related clutter covers more than 15% of your work surfaces, you are sapping your energy and your ability to concentrate. 
3. FILES, NOT PILES
–Utilize labeled hanging file folders as much as possible for instant accessibility ——-Frequently accessed files should be placed within reach from your chair.
-Use 3-ring binders to hold miscellaneous reference materials. Label the front and the spine clearly so you can grab the correct binder every time.
-Inactive files should be dated and boxed and stored away from your frequently used files.
4. PAPER
-Use the 5 basket system (Label baskets IN, OUT, FILE/ENTER, ACT,
-Deliver contents of the OUT basket at least twice a day or send items with someone going in that direction
-Devote time once a day to empty the FILE basket
-Place all miscellaneous notes, etc in the appropriate basket ie: numbers you need to enter in your address book
-staple business cards directly to the cards in your rolodex
5. MAGAZINES
Refer to table of contents of a magazine to decide which articles you want to read. Use the RIP and READ method and place these articles in a folder along with a highlighter.
-Keep this folder in your car or briefcase and take it with you when anticipate you have time to kill
6. CONTROL YOUR TIME
—If you don’t schedule your time, someone else will.
-Set aside blocks of time each day to return phone calls in batches. If you speak to voice mail, leave a detailed message stating the action you want the recipient to take. Include two best times to contact you.
-Learn to say no, or at least think before you say yes to any time commitment which is not a necessary part of your career future.
-When under pressure to finish a project , give yourself permission to tell co-workers that you can’t be disturbed.
-Let non-crucial phone calls go to voice mail.
-Be prepared; it’s much easier to greet tomorrow when you have a plan.
-Try to PLAN at least 60% OF YOUR TIME. Planning your day helps you focus on
and accomplish necessary tasks while leaving ample time for interruptions or additions to your schedule.
-Experts recommend that you set aside one hour of your day for planning and organizing. Begin in increments of 15 minutes, preferbly at the end of your day
 

Office Management (Work or Home)

Fact: The average person has more than 3000 documents at home!
Fact: 80% of the items you file will never be looked at again!
Fact: Costs due to chaos – late fees, last-minute payments, unused coupons – can be 15 to
          20% of your  budget!
WORKSPACE
-Should be bright, invigorating, but conducive to work
-Desks should not face doorway or scenic window to minimize distractions
-Chairs should be comfortable, correct height for user, etc.
-Frequently used items should be placed within reach without having to get out of your seat
-Move anything that is not used frequently away from the immediate work area
TIME CONTROL
-Non-work related clutter (pictures, personal items, plants) should not occupy more than 15% of your
  work area
-If you don’t schedule your time, someone else will.
-Try to PLAN at least 60% of YOUR TIME. Planning your day helps you focus on
and accomplish necessary tasks while leaving ample time for interruptions or additions to your schedule.
-Experts recommend that you set aside one hour of your day for planning. Begin in increments of 15 minutes, preferably at the end of your day
-Set aside blocks of time each day to return phone calls in batches. If you speak to voice mail, leave a detailed message stating the action you want the recipient to take. Include two best times to contact you.
-Learn to say no, or at least think before you say yes to any time commitment which is not a necessary part of your career future.
-When under pressure to finish a project , give yourself permission to tell co-workers that you can’t be disturbed.
 
-Let non-crucial phone calls go to voice mail.
-Keep a folder of work or articles you want to read in your car or briefcase and take it to places where you anticipate you will have time to kill, such as doctor’s office or garage
-Be prepared; it’s much easier to greet tomorrow when you have a plan.

GENERAL MAINTENANCE:
Immediately and on a periodic basis toss anything that is useless, outdated, unidentifiable, or unsalvageable. (expired coupons, credit solicitations) As a general rule, if it doesn’t affect your taxes, you probably don’t need to keep it.
-Use the 5 BASKET SYSTEM to manage daily paperwork:
IN…For new items that arrive on your desk
TO DO/READ…For items that you need to act on, you want to read over
TO FILE/RECORD…For items that need to be filed, entered in your address book, PDA, computer. 
      Devote time once a day to empty FILE/RECORD basket
OUT…For items that you have processed or that need someone else’s attention. Deliver contents of
      the OUT basket at least twice a day or send items with someone going in that direction
RECYCLE/TRASH…Try to recycle any materials you intend to toss
 
-Make a labeled hanging-file folder for each category or account. DO NOT use manila envelopes for    storing items in a filing cabinet for the reason “out of sight” means “out of mind.”
-Maintain a calendar in a central location. Use different colored pens to designate appointments that pertain to different people.
-Use 3-ring binders to hold miscellaneous reference materials. Label the front and spine clearly so you can grab the correct binder every time.
-Inactive files should be dated, boxed and stored away from your frequently used files.
BUSINESS CARDS:
-Each time you are offered a new business card, on the back of the card immediately jot down when, where and if not obvious, why you met the person who gave you the card and any other pertinent information.
-Staple business cards directly to your Rolodex cards
-Periodically weed through your business cards asking yourself: why am I keeping these cards? …will I ever utilize their services?…will I really refer them to someone else?…are they reputable?…do you remember WHO or WHAT the card concerns?
PERIODICALS:
-DO NOT save an entire magazine or newspaper when only a portion of it interests you. Most of the time you will not remember why you saved it. If you intend on reading an article at a later date, use the RIP & READ method: Rip or clip the article, stapling multiple pages together, and place in your TO READ basket.
-Toss magazines that are 6 months old and newspapers that are 2 weeks old, realizing that if you haven’t read them by now, you probably will never make time to read them.
-Use magazine keepers for magazines that you want to protect and reference later.
TAX RECORDS:
Pertinent tax information should be kept for at least 7 YEARS. This includes: a copy of your tax return form and W2’s, credit card statements